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to dominate his second. that is the nation's debt and deficit. we already reached the $16 trillion debt limit set by congress. treasury secretary tim geithner says his accounting tricks and maneuvers can only buy us a couple more months the president wants to call on congress to raise the debt ceiling without drama. he says even the threat, note to raise the debt ceiling could cause a down-tick in the nation's credit rating as it did in 2011. republicans are determined to use that leverage. it may be the only leverage they have to raise the nation's debt ceiling. in the past it has worked to demand spending cuts in exchange for raising the nation's debt ceiling. they intend to do it this time. heather? heather: a lot going on in washington. we hear rumors the president may address the issue of immigration reform. that may be one of the top priorities of his administration. is he expected to talk about that? >> reporter: perhaps but even before that the president is likely to be asked about efforts to curb the nation's gun violence with vice president biden set to give recommendations to the p
before, and have bid have a conversation on how we reduce our deficits further in a sensible way. -- i would have a conversation about how to reduce our deficits in a sensible way. we can talk about how we can make sure we finance our workers getting properly trained and are schools getting the education they deserve. there is a whole growth agenda that is important does well. -- as well. what you have not seen as the notion that has been presented so far by the republicans that deficit reduction will only cover spending cuts, that we will raise the debt ceiling dollar for dollar on spending cuts. there are a whole set of rules that have been established that are impossible to meet without doing severe damage to the economy. we're not going to put ourselves in a position where, in order to pay for the spending we have already incurred, where the two options are we were way to either profoundly hurt the economy, hurt seniors, hurt kids trying to go to college or we will blow up the economy. we will not do that. not whatever congress does. they will have to send me something that is sens
component to growing our economy and broadening opportunity for the middle class is shrinking our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. and for nearly two years now i've been fighting for such a plan, one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decade which would stabilize our debt and our deficit in a sustainable way for the next decade. that would be enough not only to stop the growth of our debt relative to the size of our economy, but it would make it manageable so it doesn't crowd out the investments we need to make in people and education and job training, science medical research, all the things that help us grow. now, step by step we've made progress toward that goal. over the past two years, i've signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two weeks ago, i signed in a law more than $600 billion in new revenue by making sure the wealthiest americans begin to pay their fair share. when you add the money that we'll save in interest payments on the debt, altogether that adds up to a total of about $2.5 trillion in deficit reduc
that deal with the deficit and also have a vision and the stability in what is going to happen in terms of the voting of economic growth. estimate what the peak to the cut a piece of that. the spending on health not necessarily the biggest cost of the deficit right now but if you look at 20 years, for 30 years it is the alligator that is going to swallow everything. i was on a panel last week and there was a lively argument around should we raise the age for medicare, should we try to change the system and have a fee for service, has the obama administration done a lot to lower the cost of health care going forward so we don't need to do much more? what do you think is in practical terms what needs to be done on health care if you poll people they say we all want to cut medicare celerity want to go dealing with that piece of the puzzle? >> that reminds me when i was in graduate school i went to study foreign policy and was right around the time they balanced the budget and i thought my gosh what am i going to do? so i realized the long-term problems were still there and i had to make a
is not the deficits, but the fact that federal government collects 2.5 trillion. with the consumption or sales tax, this is the lone way we can limit how much money gets to the federal government and more businesses would be created and jobs and the federal government would not be penalizing our work and we would get more work and jobs. >> sounds good to me, rick, to you? >> here's the problem. i will not touch incredibly regressive nature of this. >> by regressive, it hits the poor more than the rich? >> exactly. put the brakes on a economy, imagine what happens here. first of all, to keep the revenue neutral, you are looking at a 20r 30 percent sales tax . add that to the state tax that governor gindale wants to add. no one will be able to afford it or go shopping. >> steve, this is a country of experiment ground . the states experiment with things that might do better. >> there are 9 states who don't have a personal income tax. you compare the state of vermont with the state of new hampshire. new hampshire has no sales tax or personal income tax and does better over time than the neighboring st
of deficit reduction, a little short of 4 trillion we need, but he would have the american public believe he's significantly reduced our deficit as president. >> which makes you wonder why we need another 2 trillion dollars so desperately now as we are getting ready for the beginning of his second term. obviously, that's 2 1/2 trillion that is, well, fanciful in my opinion and ethereal in others and it's not a reduction in baseline, it's a reduction in the rate of growth of spending, which is again suffocating to the private economy and unsustainable over the course of the next several years. >> megyn: one thing we did hear the president reference personally, we heard it from nancy pelosi prior, but the president personally talking about now closing more loopholes and that means higher taxes. we don't know on who, but he would not specify any specific spending reductions and refusing to negotiate with the house republicans on the issue of the debt ceiling. lou, an interesting couple of months. looking forward to it. >> megyn: all right. thank you, sir. >> thanks, megyn. >> megyn: with the pr
. >> reporter: the president is gearing up for fights on gun control, deficit reduction, with likely deep defense budget cuts and immigration reform. on tuesday, we will know whether the vice-president will recommend an assault weapons ban. most doubt he will go that far and will look for stronger background checks. on immigration, the president looks likely to get more bipartisan support, with republicans, such as senator marco rubio, presenting similar measures to create a path to citizenship for the current 12 million illegal americans. >> thank you very much. senator lindsay graham isn en route to our studio. i will ask him about gun control and the debate and the cabinet recommendations. send us your questions for senator graham. we will ask him some of your questions. that live interview is in our next hour. in congressional democrats believe it does matter when it comes to the 14th amendment and the debt. listen to this. >> i can say that this administration does not believe that the 14th amendment gives the president the power to ignore the debt ceiling. >> shannon: all right sm.
up 4 consecutive trillion-dollar federal budget deficits in his first term. he has an economy that is not being returned to prosperity. 23 million people still unemployed. we have, i think bill. i think if i may. you undersell folks just a little bit in that i think everybody is smart enough to know there is is a problem. i think everybody is pretty much smart enough to know that we have got to come up with a solution. when you have a national media part of this coalition of interest and depen dense on the democratic party, there is no way for them to have validation. there is no way for them to have an aggressive watchdog that would normally, traditionally, historically be attacking the miss adventure of those in power. >> we agree that the media is in the tank. i'm almost stunned that you think, to quote you, everybody understands the issue. i will tell you why, you go right outside the fox news channel building now and you stop people and go what about the federal debt? come on. >> let me put it in some context. there was a time in this country and everybody may be slightly
for the taxpayers' use or the expression goes, to reduce the federal deficit. >> thank you, gentleman. i yield back, mr. chairman. >> mr. hastings. >> i don't have any questions. >> thank you very much. without a doubt of funds, which i'm working on, -- [inaudible] [laughter] >> thank you, mr. chairman. i ask that the gentleman, i know he's speaking on behalf of the constituents when we bring the amendment to the bill, the size of the package with the addition of your amendment, becomes larger than many entire appropriations bills. $60 billion. that's larger than homeland security appropriations bill. mr. king, that's larger than the financial services appropriation bill. that's larger than the state department foreign operations appropriations bill. these are bills from which this congress deliberates for months. hearing the chairman say before you came up to testify that he was committed to making sure that your folks get those things that they need. hearing the priorities that everyone has laid out, knowing these are not optional things that are needed, these are mandatory things that are need
reduced the federal deficit even by a dollar. we are not going to get out of this overnight. this would allow us to keep reducing the deficits. we have a shared value in eliminating waste, fraud, and abuse. we are intent on that. host: how much of the budget does waste, fraud, and abuse make up? guest: i could go back to virginia beach, virginia, and we could identify waste every day. we will never eliminate it entirely. we can do a better job. it will take reforms. we are living longer and we have fewer people paying in. i want to protect those who are hurting the most, like art, who called in earlier. host: lester is a republican. caller: good morning. disability, 63 years old. my wife still works. $45,000 a less taw less than year. somehow someone is going to have to do something about this. guest: i agree completely. i believe it is immoral for one generation to pass on debt that dims their future. those who have served our country -- i am mindful of the price paid by our goldstar families. we're failing the young people. i am with you. i was over it. i believe when americans are gi
of all, we've had some deficit reduction. the president laid out a couple days ago. we had over $2 # trillion. we had a trillion and a half that came from previous actions, and then we added just a few days ago some further deficit reduction through increased taxes on the very wealthy of this country. we already begun to undertake deficit reduction. to use that as a reason to use the debt ceiling as a weapon is really playing with fire. they say pay some bills and not pay others. we've never tried that before. >> host: is it feasible? >> guest: i don't think so. which bills? social security? veterans? people out fighting for this country? which bills do you pay? we never tried that. i think the president put it so well. this is not a debt beat nation, really, and i think common sense is likely to prevail within the republican ranks. i know, if i might say so, if not firsthand, second hand, that the leadership within the house republican caucus, not all of it, i think some of it realizes that the potential consequences. >> host: if president obama won, so to speak on the fiscal clif
fighting for such a plan, one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decade which would stabilize our debt and our deficit in a sustainable way for the next day-to-day. jon: so what about that statement from the president, true or false? a fact check on that and a bunch of others. we'll have the answers for you coming up. jon: right now lawmakers are working on a strategy to try to keep the government running. they only have about 4-6 weeks left before the nation hits the national debt ceiling. republicans are calling for budge cuts in return for raising the debt ceiling, but president obama came out swinging during his news conference on monday claiming he's already gone a long way toward closing the budget gap. joining us now to fact check some of his statements, stephen hayes, a senior writer for the weekly standard and a fox news contributor, douglas holtz-eakin is now president of the american action forum. just as a general rule, steven, when you heard the president speaking in that news conference, was he generally being honest with the american people about
a conversation about how to redust our deficit let's have that. we've been having that nor the last two years. we just had an entire campaign about it. by the way the american people agreed with me that we should reduce our deficits in a balanced way that takes into account the need for us to grow this economy. martha: bob beckel is former democratic campaign manager and cohost of the five. mary katherine ham is editor at large and fox news contributor. why do you think it was so testy yesterday? >> obama's best form is not necessarily a press conference which is why he does than do many of them. i which he was testy for one real reason. the republicans trying to take the full faith and crucify the united states currency and putting it at fist being. i'd invoke the 14th amendment, we'd problem below know that if we spent more time with the republicans wasting time on the floor of the house. i thought he ought to raise it and to hell with congress. martha: we talked to stewart varney and kirsten said in that sound byte, this isn't about default, people don't think we aren't going to pay the debt o
politicians and the commanders on the ground are creating a large deficit of trust. after "rolling stone" interview in which mcchrystal slammed obama and members of the administration, he was forced to resign. he said he did not end as he would have wished. today he says he has moved on with his life and is now free to speak his mind. >> afghanistan is hard. it's always been hard. if you study their history, it's never anything but complex and difficult. >> i spent a career carrying typically an m-16 and later an m-4 carbine. i personally don't think there is any need for that kind of weaponry on the streets, and particularly in and around the schools in america. i like the fact that chuck hagel has had his feet in the mud as a soldier. i like the fact that he's had a lot of background. >> joining me now is the former top commander in afghanistan, retired general stanley mcchrystal. he has a brand-new memoir called "my share of the task." general, nice to see you. >> good to see you, chuck. >> we have heard you on a number of topics. it was interesting on the assault weapon. i want to st
. he will have to talk a lot more in the state of the union about deficit control. we have this new fox poll out tonight to. people are upset about fiscal cliff deal. when asked if their paycheck is smaller this year because of more taxfuls being taken out 60% say yes 25% say no. he is going to have to talk about more deficit reduction. they will do a will little partying this weekend they real lives it's right back to work, bill. >> word of a solution to prevent the united states from defaultingen its debt. the house majority leader eric cantor saying that lawmakers will vote next week on a short-term plan to let the government borrow more money effectively raising the debt ceiling. the deal not all worked out just yet. but apparently it this will not require the spending cuts that house republicans had wanted. just released fox news poll finds that 69% favor raising the debt limit only if there are major spending cuts involved. and 23% say it's reckless not to raise it regardless. the poll also shows more than 8 in 10 think government spending is out of control. only 11% believes it's
, the big fights over the budget and the dealt ceiling and deficit -- the debt ceiling, deficit reduction, also the bin laden raid and what happened in egypt and libya. and so i'm looking at how obama made the decisions he made and took -- why he took the actions he took in that very pear rillous time -- perilous time for him politically. but i also explained how this is all done in a way to set up the 2012 campaign that we just went through. he had a theory, after he took that big hit in 2010, he had a theory that he could make the 2012 race a choice not just between him and mitt romney, but a choice between different ideologies, different approaches to government, between different sets of visions and values. and everything he did, um n that time frame he kept trying to tether to this big idea he had about a choice. and when i wrote
be asked to testify whether or not psycho paths have affective deficits. absolutely they do. there has been hundreds of years of psychiatric research shows that they do. you have this two prong thing. on the one hand more dangerous if you release them and don't treat them. on the other hand, they're affectively different. there was a very nice article in the "new york times" magazine on mother's day about children who have these emerging traits and how we would develop and understand and treat them. it's a small percentage. my goal is to develop better treatment so they can keep them off that trajectory towards life course persistent problems. >> are you saying that people that have the brain structure that you have identified will always be lacking in volitional control or impulse receive to the extent that they are criminals? do we have a subset of people that are criminals because of their brains? >> i should really differentiate psychopathy from criminality. there are a lot of reasons why individuals engage in different criminal activity. it's a very small percentage of prisoners that a
sports stories talk about a roller-coaster ride seattle coming back from a 20 point deficit. they go with a second hail mary. atlanta wins. pate yos one whi -- patriots on away. they beat the texans. the time 41 after the hour. still ahead everyone is being forced to get health insurance or pay a fee. now it turns out obama care has more hidden secrets for taxpayers. do you want to know what it is like to be a prince or princess? it may be more of a cinderella story than a fairy tale. >> insurance companies say there has to be a mandate to make it cost effective. we have story. >> the affordable care act may get beefed up even more if insurance companies get their way. it is key to making the new law work by offsetting the cost to help six people as well. the penalty for not getting insurance is $95 or one percent of the income. in 2015 it will be $325 or two percent of your income. still much less than the cost of insurance. at those rates many healthy people will on the to forego insurance especially since they know if they get sick down the road they will not be turned away. all o
in the late 1980's when we didn't have to talk about how to pay for disaster assistance because the deficit was only $3 trillion. but we've so badly mismanaged our money after that, by the time we got to hurricane katrina in 2005, that we actually did start talking about offsetting and paying for disaster relief and paid for and offset about 40% of it. but we didn't learn. we didn't learn from those mistakes and we've continued to mismanage our money and to run up our deficit to such a point now where we're at $16 trillion today and it's incumbent upon us to have the discussion about whether or not we have the money to do this. and whether or not it's important enough to us to pay for it. i wish very much that we weren't here today. i wish very much that we could pass this and easily borrow the money, without any questions whatsoever. but we've wasted that opportunity. we've mismanaged our own finances to the point where we are now no longer capable of taking care of our own. think about that for a second. in the united states of america we do not have enough money to take care of our own c
to quit spending money and try to cut into this deficit. >> reporter: house republicans see the debt ceiling deadline next month as one of the best ways early in the president's second term to force him to accept a new round of spending cuts and may have it on an incremental basis, one, two o three months and using that process to achieve more deficit reduction. >> former speaker of the house and republican presidential candidate newt gingrich. good morning mr. speaker. >> it's good to be with you. >> good to be with you. you say fighting over the debt ceiling is a bad idea for congressional republicans. why? >> because in the end it's a threat they can't sustain. no one is going to default. no one is going to allow the united states to not pay its bills. no one is going to accept the economic costs. it rallies the entire business community to the president's side and the fact is republicans have two much bet ear renas to fight over spending they have a continuing resolution which funds government which comes up at the end of march and they have the sequester,
going to reduce the deficit. he knew that wasn't true and the deficit has gone through the roof and he said this to congress, deficit has gone through the roof since then. so he really -- there are a lot of republicans and one democrat, but there are a lot of republicans that didn't like his testimony. his testimony was false. and we'll see what happens. he's going to probably get the -- he's going to get it. a lot of things aren't being stopped. the republicans have not found a good way to stop things. and i'm not sure necessarily he should get stopped. this was the president's choice. the president did win the election. the president does have the right to make appointments and this is one of his appointments. but what he told congress was totally false and probably knowingly false. >> steve: i'm sure when he's called before that senate committee he's gog have an explanation of what he meant then and what he means now. >> they were tough statements and terrible statements and they couldn't have been more wrong. >> steve: yeah. turns out to be that case. all right. mr. trump, thank y
will force senate democrats to get involved in the deficit reduction debate by passing a budget by april. >>> and former new orleans mayor, ray nagin, who promised to crack down on corruption, has been indicted on corruption charges. nagin is facing 21 counts, including wire fraud, bribery and money laundering. abc's mark greenblatt has this story. >> reporter: indicted for corruption. the one-time former rock star mayor of new orleans, stands caused of becoming exactly what he campaigned against. >> this state and this city, is saying to the old-line politicos we're tired of the games. we're tired of the corruption. and we want to go in a new direction. >> reporter: it's a striking fall from grace for ray nagin, as the justice department now charges him with awarding lucrative city contracts in exchange for kickbacks and trips to vacation hot spots like hawaii, jamaica and las vegas. he's accused of pocketing more than $200,000 in bribes. and the indictment even charges nagin with trying to pocket cash for himself, as the city struggled to recover from hurricane katrina. ? one case, nag
important thing he could do is tax reform and deficit control. if he could put those two things together, that'd be bigger than health care. >> steve: you know what? if he were to work with the republicans talking reform-- >> i think that's a lock for next year. >> steve: well, he wants to do something about it. some republicans want to do something about it, remember last time with health care, the republicans had a bunch of ideas and the democrats shut them out completely. maybe this time bipartisan. >> brian: that's not the harry reid i know. >> alisyn: let's get to other stories in the headlines, late last noos night, two drones strikes, at least three of the bodies were burned beyond recognition. the death toll could rise in the hostage crisis at a gas plant in algeria. many were killed including one american. two americans are still missing and the crisis ended yesterday when the algerian army attacked the plant killing two militants. president obama said this is attack is another reminder of the threat posed by al-qaeda and other violent extremist groups in north africa. and the p
, negotiating with unions has made big headlines in the past year's budget deficit exploding, as you know, but one story in the "wall street journal" really caught my attention because the strong-arm tactics being used. just one example, the police union in california began a harassment campaign against the city manager. after he announced the city may have to lay off 16% of the municipal workforce. the union bought the house next door to him to make his life miserable and they invested in billboards welcoming visitors famous as the second most dangerous city in california and it put his phone number at the bottom. keep in mind this is if you ended up going bankrupt because of unsustainable costs. this is all too familiar to the costa mesa mayor who joins me now. they moved in next to the city manager and they unleash a flurry of construction making all kinds of racket and bullying him at home. does this shock you are similar to something you went through as well? >> five years ago it would shock me. what you find out is these unions in a lot of public safety unions have used strong-arm t
this. yes, it may run up the immediate deficit, but once again, for every dollar that we invest in those levees we not only save lives and property, but we put people to work and we get the economic engine going. further up in my district, again, along the sacramento and the rivers, i have a project that's 44 miles of levee that clearly will fail. it has failed four times in the last 60 years. lives have been lost. one of the most catastrophic failures of a levee happened in this stretch of river. we need to rebuild that. the federal government's role in these construction projects of these levees has gone back to the very beginning of this nation and it is congress' task to allocate the money to decide the projects that are going to be built. but unfortunately we tied ourselves in knots here with certain rules that have been put in by our republican colleagues that prevent us from taking the necessary action to protect our communities. we're not talking about, you know, willy nily unnecessary projects. we're talking about saving -- nilly unnecessary projects. we're talking abou
on for falcons fans harris, a 20-0 deficit. en russell wilson, down 14-0 and led them back to victory and took the lead, the seahawks did with 31 seconds left with the atlanta falcons into the next round, the championship game where they will host and a big win for matt ryan, his first career playoff victory and that's important, because he was drafted in the first round to kind of resurrect the falcon franchise after michael vick had the disastrous mess that took them downward. and we're looking at the winning field goal. and the nfc championship is set. and the 9ers handled green bay last night. what kind of matchup are we talking about here? >> a good regional matchup. southeast and then the falcons and atlanta against the west coast and 49ers. jim harbaugh has a second year quarterback, colin kaepernick who ran the ball well and as a starter, and some people thought it was a foolish gamble, but worked so far, he obviously can throw the ball as well and then, you have the falcons who will be at home and i have to say it was the noiseiest i heard the georgia dome in years and they encouraged
it himself. what i'm told is that we can expect to touch as you might expect on deficits and debt. on immigration and gun control. but he is also going to address our seemingly broken politics. you have to remember the inaugural address is part of a large day of events and the people who are organizing it well placed democrats tell me that they are trying to make sure that one appeared, including the president. no one appears to be spiking the football. they don't want people watching at home as one democrat said to me to get the idea that oh, he, meaning the president, is having a big party while the rest of us are still mired in a financial crisis, bill. >> bill: yeah. they are even having trouble filling the party. the address is monday night. we will be live on the factor. we have a really good lineup. i have seen a change in the demeanor as i said to senator rubio of president obama. is he a little more in your face than he was before the election. just real quick, rosen, you have seen that change? >> yeah. and i think the nomination of chuck hagel shows it. >> bill: okay. no
our debt to g.d.p., our deficit to g.d.p. down around 3%, which is the basis of all economists left, right and center all agree on the areas we can begin to grow as a country. and as my grandfather used to say with grace of god and goodwill of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail now between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling and we may meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and to put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today, because as important as they all are today we have a more urgent and immediate call and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics better than anyone so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i owe an incredible debt of gratitude to you at the head table and those of you in the room. i know we don't have unanimity in this ballroom nor do we in any ballroom, but we all acknowledge that we have to do something. we have to act. and i hope we all agree, there is
. for decades we have piled for decades we have piled deficit upon deficit, mortgaging our future and our children's future for the temporary convenience of the present. to continue this long trend is to guarantee tremendous social, cultural, political, and economic upheavals. you and i, as individuals, can, by borrowing, live beyond our means, but for only a limited period of time. why, then, should we think that collectively, as a nation, we're not bound by that same limitation? we must act today in order to preserve tomorrow. and let there be no misunderstanding -- we are going to begin to act, beginning today. [applause] the economic ills we suffer have come upon us over several decades. they will not go away in days, weeks, or months, but they will go away. they will go away because we as americans have the capacity now, as we've had in the past, to do whatever needs to be done to preserve this last and greatest bastion of freedom. in this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem, government is the problem. [applause] from time to time we've been tempted to belie
the american economy. >> steve: here is somebody who dealt with enormous deficits firsthand, the former governor of the golden state of california, arnold schwarzenegger. good morning to you. >> good morning. nice to be here again. >> brian: he sends a warning to the republicans should they back off or take on the president? >> first of all, i think i find it interesting that when you want to have more money, if you go to any financial institution, they say look, i can't pay my bills, i need more money. they want to see their payment plan. how are you going to live responsible from here on? then you can get more money. so i don't understand that why this should not be a part of the discussion because it ought to be. i think america should not just blindly go in there and keep spending money that we don't have. every single day we're spending more and more money. every year it's like $1.3 trillion more than we have and then it gets added to the debt and that's why this short period of time we have seen the debt go up. >> steve: we have a live picture of the debt now. all right, governor.
they need to put inshunes on a gun like you do a car. host: so often we focus on the u.s. debt or deficit, we have exceeded now the dealt limit of $16.4 trillion. you can see in the upper left-hand side the debt clock. difficult choices on the debt if the u.s. think it's ceiling. the piece points out by mid february or early march the united states could face an unprecedented default unless it raises the debt ceiling. that was from tim geithner. further into the body of the "new york times" story i want to is share with you some of the numbers "the new york times" points out today. that could happen as early as february 15, if that happens by february 15 or early march, according to the by partisan policy center in analysis of what the government expects is $8 billion in revenue that day but it has $52 billion in spending that day, $6.8 billion in tax refunds, $3.5 in federal salaries, and $1.5 ode to military contractors and other commitments. consider again that day on february 15 f that is the day we reach the limit, the country would not have enough money to pay the bond holders let a
remains committed to further reducing the deficit in a balanced way. so that is the response from the white house after the gop at its retreat in virginia came out with the possibility that perhaps we could extend the debt limit for another three months but the senate has to pass a budget, so the republicans which it has not done in four years. so. tracy: no surprise from the white us house. ashley: says no. tracy: okay, then. how about this. hank paulson says he hates the debt limit. you remember the former treasury secretary, the guy who said i need $700 billion right now? no wonder he hates it. ashley: don't we all. tracy: he has given a rare interview. we have details on that next. ashley: first a look at today's winners and losers. the dow just above the water mark. take a look. we'll be right back. ♪ chances are you've become, a better driver over the years. and one company thinks your auto insurance rates should get better too. presenting the aarp auto insurance program from the hartford. i'm a good driver. have been for years. it just makes sense that better, more experi
and republicans. out of that, hopefully, some progress being made to get this deficit and debt under control. we believe our obligation is to help prevent a debt crisis from hitting this country. republicans have had a tough spot here. the president of united states as he is not negotiating the debt ceiling. he says it is simply up to congress. it is due to spending that is already approved. the majority of republicans voted against the deal because there were no spending cuts. this was the first strategy session. we are going to have these fights throughout the spring. back to you. cheryl: we just had a guest trying to tell us to avoid the noise in washington. thank you very much, rich. dennis: let's take a look at apple shares right now. down five dollars. 1%. another tip today. an analyst says do not hang up on the iphone maker. that cancellation of orders for iphone parts, it is not tied to sell drop in demand for iphone5. apple is moving toward so-called -- screens from different suppliers. analyst who are usually critical of apple came out and said, look, this recent sellout, way overdone.
veer -- inadvertently did not disclose information, you are put at a credibility deficit with the public, and sometimes it is hard to dig out of that. it is very difficult for organizations, especially in a crisis response, to think about just releasing the information before it's asked for and remove that deficit. i've been involved in several situations where the information was available and the information was understandable and probably mitigated some of the concerns, but because of the way the companies in the government work, it was difficult to make that transparent and then catching up with that with the american public is really, really difficult. nancy and marcia, we had talked about this with jay a lot. one of the problems we have in mental anguishing impacts -- measuring the impacts of the spill in the gulf is the lack of the background of the presence of hydrocarbons as a baseline for understanding there had been a change. in the context of moving beyond the direct aims of the research that's going to be conducted with the bp money, what do you think the lar
. that california is nowhere near balancing the budget. they have had multibillion-dollar deficits in the past. what i like to do, some of my friends who don't believe taxes matter including the guy in the white house, i say if you don't think taxes matter and affect behavior, explain to me, bill, why it is there has been about 500,000 new jobs over the last 10 years created in texas with no income tax and where california lost about 500,000 jobs? there is lot of factors but i think taxes are one of them. bill: 13% for california. if that is the case they leapfrogged hawaii. matt, give you the last point. if bobby jindal gets his way do folks in louisiana have a better chance at tracking jobs? >> absolutely yes. look at call to, what jerry brown is doing is short-term fix. bringing money by increasing taxes but the long-term effect jobs will leave, people will leave and hurt the economy long term. bill: matt, thank you. steve moore, thank you as well. e-mail is hemmer@foxnews.com. viewers on home on twitter that follow me, @billhemmer, file your one word, not one word, one line. martha: one word is
. the problem is if you'd inadvertently did not disclose information, you are put out a credibility deficit with the public, and sometimes it is hard to get out of that, and it is difficult for or organizations to think about releasing the information before it is out for. -- asked for. i have been involved in several situations where the information was available and understandable. it mitigated some concerns. it was difficult to make that transparent, and catching up with that is really difficult. one reason for the impact was the lack of information as a baseline for understanding there had been a change. as a context for moving beyond the research done, what do you think the larger research agenda ought to be about? >> the hydrocarbons in the continental shelf and inland areas are pretty well known. it is the deep sea we did not have information for. i think the deep sea ecosystem is an area we need to emphasize, and some of the longer living organisms such as marine mammals. one of the issues is the effect of multiple stressors. we have some smart jury is that were heavily oiled, and s
's fake money. >> suze orman, you rock. >> thank you. you get to pay off our deficit. >> the suze orman show airs saturday night at 9:00 p.m. and 12:00 a.m. eastern. you already knew that. >> we're taking a walk on the wild side with patrick monihan. >> no, kate, don't do it. [ female announcer ] what makes florida's natural orange juice taste so uniquely fresh and delicious? is it the rich florida soil? or the perfect blend of sunshine, rain, and temperature? maybe it's the fact that florida's natural oranges are never imported. they're raised right here in florida, and passed with care from our hands to yours. 100% pure. 100% florida. florida's natural. i'd like to thank eating right, whole grain, multigrain cheerios! mom, are those my jeans? [ female announcer ] people who choose more whole grain tend to weigh less than those who don't. multigrain cheerios waiting for your wrinkle cream to work? neutrogena® rapid wrinkle repair has the fastest retinol formula. to visibly reduce fine lines and wrinkles in just one week. neutrogena®. to visibly reduce fine lines and wrinkles in just
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